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Homework – love it or hate it?

Published by i.wilson on

Home blank Forums Discussion Forum Homework – love it or hate it?

This topic contains 6 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 4 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #2320

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    Can you remember doing your homework on the night before – telling your parents about it just before you went to bed? what are your views about giving children homework in primary school? Should this be compulsory or should it be eliminated completely? I’ve provide some links to some previous waffles I have written about the subject if you want to see what I think.

    As always I have provided a survey for you to enter your own views anonymously but remember you can also register for the forums and enter your views as a reply to this post. There are no right or wrong views about this.

    Can we have some more homework?

    Alternative to homework?

  • #2814

    Anonymous
    Participant

    I think homework is a good thing in moderation. As with everything in school we need to ensure it is fresh, entertaining, engaging and is based on and centred on the children’s interests. Why would we not use the same approach that we use with our lesson planning? In practice I have seen children hugely interested in homework by being allowed scope and freedom to explore a topic how they see fit. Obviously this needs to be monitored and have some guidance, for example through topic or through medium used, but I have seen India given as homework and one child made a model of the Taj Mahal with facts all around, whilst another made a tourist booklet on the country. Both worked well and both engaged the children. This principle could surely be applied to other interests. Homework needs not to be oppressive and should encourage and nurture children and their interests. It should be something enjoyed that sets them up for adult life, not that gets them down.

  • #2924

    Anonymous
    Participant

    I always remember being very excited in year 2 because that was when I got my first homework book to complete. As I got older through school, I never remember getting a lot of homework, just lots of spellings to learn. I do not have a strong opinion on whether it should be given or not. It depends on the teacher as they will know their class the best and know whether it will be beneficial for the children.

  • #2925

    Anonymous
    Participant

    I think homework is appropriate for those in Key Stage 2 (maybe even just upper KS2) as they need to be prepared for secondary school and they should be taking more responsibility for their own learning.

    I think children in KS1 should not be given homework. I do not believe they are developed enough to understand the concept of independent learning and therefore will not understand the benefits of homework. Also, parents of children in KS1 are more likely to ‘help’ their children (because they are unable to do it themselves) which diminishes any point of learning anyway.

  • #2926

    Anonymous
    Participant

    Routine homework tasks do not lead to advances in learning at primary school (see http://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/toolkit/homework/ for research evidence). This is not to say that homework is therefore completely pointless, but that teachers have been setting the wrong type. Homework must be centred on either preparing children for learning to come, or in consolidating/practising/reinforcing concepts. Spelling lists, routine tasks, or children being given research tasks should be avoided. What could be argued is that homework can develop self discipline, or time management skills. Perhaps. I remember 2 homework tasks from the entire 13 years I was set it. One was a punishment: write an essay on the career we hope to have as an adult; the other was to make a Viking longboat from card: my dad did it.

  • #2927

    Anonymous
    Participant

    I think homework is a good idea if carried out in a more exciting way. Just having a worksheet or reading books etc may put children off. If it was carried out in a more engaging way, like lessons, children may be more motivated to do it and thus learn more from it.
    It is tricky though because if the children are struggling and their parents are unable to help it may lower their self-esteem and motivation. It seems to me that it is about finding the perfect balance which will differ for each child.

  • #2928

    Anonymous
    Participant

    I believe home work is a useful tool to re enforce what has been learnt in lessons, but only when the work follows on from classroom topics. Home work such as spelling and times tables, while both important in development should have more of an in school focus and any work given should give children the opportunity of be creative as learners.

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