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Response to low level disruptive behaviour.

Published by i.wilson on

Home blank Forums Discussion Forum Response to low level disruptive behaviour.

This topic contains 13 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  i.wilson 5 years ago.

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  • #2245

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    Here is the document from OFSTED discussion ‘Below the radar’ behaviour
    http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/below-radar-low-level-disruption-country%E2%80%99s-classrooms

    Watch this video:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-29342539

    What do you think about the behaviour management strategies implemented within the academy.

  • #2246

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    Here is an article from the Guardian website – 10 ways to deal with low level behaviour

    http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/teacher-blog/2013/may/21/classroom-disruption-top-tips

  • #2353

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    I’ve added some of the replies from the Survey below….these were all anonymous due to the survey

    • This reply was modified 5 years ago by  i.wilson.
  • #2354

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    Although from experience I agree that low-level disruption is damaging to class learning, I believe a lot of the responsibility is also on the class teacher: The school has expectations of it’s pupils as a whole but sometimes easier to implement are the expectations a teacher has of their class. A head teacher would not be able to be in every classroom enforcing a change in behavior policy like this. That said, I definitely approve of the head teacher having a presence at lunchtimes, both in the lunch hall and outside. I believe that this presence greatly improves children’s behavior. From working in a school and from memories of my own schooling the head teacher often has an authoritative gravitas (the person at the top, the person that most often addresses the school during assembly) that can have a more immediate effect on children’s behavior. It’s a shame head teachers can’t be everywhere at once!

  • #2355

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    Although the presence of Head teachers is a positive, it should not be necessary for all parts of the day as Heads have many other responsibilities which they need to attend to. ‘Zero-tolerance’ is a strong phrase and, to me, runs the risk of some children being severely disciplined for things which may only be happening because they’re having a bad day or are dealing with personal issues. I understand that these schools need to be strict on low level disruption but the way this school is doing so seems to be too harsh and in the long run may effect how the children view school.

  • #2356

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    It’s a very exaggerated response, I feel that this may be too far in the opposite direction that it may have a counteractive effect on behaviour. It also takes away the element of enjoyment in and around the classroom, more time is invested in this strict regime rather than sparking interest and engagement in children so they are less likely to misbehave.

  • #2357

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    A bit hard line but I guess if it works. Can’t help feeling that we only saw a little bit of the schools daily routine too… I always think children tend to rebel and feel corned if you leave them with no options other than extreme discipline (military style silence etc).

  • #2358

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    On the one hand, I can understand why the school has done what it has. Children swearing at teachers, smoking in corridors and running away is obviously unacceptable. However, in a way this school now seems more like a prison- lining up in silence, walking to lesson in silence, sitting down in silence. I would have liked to have known what the lessons themselves were actually like. I don’t believe that lessons should be in silence all of the time, children can benefit from discussing ideas and learning from each other. However if OFSTED are saying that low level disruption is an issue inside of the classroom then just walking to the classroom in silence, then being able to chat again must defeat the point a little bit. The children in the video did seem to have a lot of respect for the teacher, which will help in his ability to keep his class under control. Going back to the point about the school being like a prison, I feel that perhaps the children have brought this upon themselves, any pupils year 9 and above would have been there when the school was under special measures and the behaviour was appalling, so perhaps even though this seems harsh it is a good solution. Perhaps after a few years, as long as the headteacher remains present the rules could be relaxed slightly, however this could end badly if the pupils decide to misuse their freedom. At the same time it would be easy to just trial and bring back the strict rules if necessary.

  • #2359

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    The response from the Academy was incredibly strict and powerful, but I think this was the correct decision due to the high levels of bad behaviour they have suffered from in the past. If the children were only slightly punished, they may not feel that the Academy, the staff and most of all their fellow pupils were affected by the masses of disruptive behaviour carried out previously and there for, may find it acceptable to continue acting this way.

  • #2360

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    The academy response to this is a little extreme. It does appear to have had a dramatic impact but may take away the chance of the children to be exactly that children.

  • #2361

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    Over the past two years, the response that the academy has made and the support from all staff and pupils has helped behaviour in that specific school. It has seriously helped students to learn and understand the importance of education and the unnecessary need to misbehave.

  • #2362

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    I think the Academy’s response is an effective response to low level disruption. The students seem extremely well behaved and everyone seems to know the standard of behavior expected of them. I think the idea of lining up after lunch is useful as from my previous experiences I have found that after lunch students can often become disruptive and can take a while to get settled back into learning. However I believe having the students line up silently will calm the students and make them engaged and ready to learn when they are back in the classroom. Therefore I feel their response to low level disruption will be effective.

  • #2363

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    I think the head teachers has made a great response. For a school working improve from special measures, the important of discipline cannot be underestimated. I’m sure it was difficult at first, especially for long standing staff to try and ‘regain’ control of pupils but, by doing so, they will have created a much healthier environment for learning and pupil development.

  • #2364

    i.wilson
    Keymaster

    They may believe their ‘no tolerance’ policy is working, but at what cost? Is education so important that their communication must be inhibited, their individuality not celebrated? I used to suffer from children who demonstrated disruptive behaviour throughout lessons, but I believe there must be a policy to allow them some freedom, at least at lunch and break times. Seeing them line up in silence was quite eerie, like they were not allowed to be children and when else are they supposed to be children if not whilst they are young?

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